Events

« Saturday March 02, 2013 »
Sat
Start: 9:30 am
Saturday University Asia Crossings: Travel Accounts Through Asia's History Lecture Series, presented by the GARDNER CENTER FOR ASIAN ART AND IDEAS, in partnership with the UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON JACKSON SCHOOL OF INTERNATIONAL STUDIES and ELLIOTT BAY BOOK COMPANY. This spring's ten-week series featuring an array of speakers on Asian travel as recorded by Asian travelers today has James Hargett, professor of Chinese Studies at the State University of New York at Albany, lecturing on "How and Why Did Mount Emei in China Become a 'Buddhist Mountain'?" Individual lecture tickets are $5 for SAM members, $10 for nonmembers. Series tickets are $43 for SAM members, $86 for nonmembers. The Seattle Asian Art Museum is at 1400 E. Prospect in Volunteer Park. For more information, please see www.seattleartmuseum.org.
Start: 11:00 am
Our weekly Children's Storytimes, set for most Saturday mornings each month, commence for March with this morning's reading from picture- and storybook favorites out of our children's section. Please join us for this special Children's Storytime as we join a national celebration sponsored by the NEA's "Read Across America," all coming together to celebrate the birthday of beloved Dr. Seuss. We'll have special readers to prescribe just what the good Doctor ordered during our storytime. For more information, please see www.nea.org. This should be extra fun.
Start: 5:00 pm
In Roots & Reflections: South Asians in the Pacific Northwest (University of Washington Press), University of Maryland-Baltimore County professor Amy Bhatt and Seattle University professor Nalini Iyer present the first general chronicle of how people from South Asia—India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and Sri Lanka—found their way here, most particularly from the end of World War II through the 1980s. "Grounded in the South Asian Oral History Project sponsored by the University of Washington Libraries, Roots and Reflections is a pioneering study of the establishment and growth of the vibrant South Asian communities in the Pacific Northwest. The book unfolds through the voices of individuals who were an integral part of building local communities historically and who continue to shape them today." - Deepa Banerjee, from the Foreword.
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